Tipping

Tipping in Morocco

Tipping culture in Morocco is not as firmly established as it is in some other countries, but it has been evolving, especially in tourist areas and upscale establishments. Here are some key points to understand about tipping in Morocco:

Not Mandatory but Appreciated: Tipping, known as "baksheesh" or "pourboire" in Morocco, is not obligatory, but it is generally appreciated when received. Service industry workers, such as waitstaff, hotel staff, and tour guides, often rely on tips to supplement their income.

Tipping Amount: The amount to tip can vary depending on the service received and your level of satisfaction. In restaurants, a common practice is to leave a tip of around 10% of the bill if a service charge is not included. In other situations, such as with tour guides and drivers, 10 - 20% of the total cost is a reasonable guideline.

Hotel Staff: It's customary to tip hotel staff, including bellhops and housekeepers. A small tip, typically around 10 - 20 dirhams, is appreciated for bellhops who assist with luggage, and a similar amount left daily for housekeeping staff is customary.

Marketplaces and Street Vendors: When shopping in Moroccan markets and souks, bargaining is expected. After agreeing on a price, it's polite to round up the final amount as a tip to the vendor. This is a common practice and helps maintain a positive interaction.

Use Local Currency: Whenever possible, tip in Moroccan dirhams (MAD) to ensure that the recipient can easily use the tip without the need for currency conversion.

Bargaining and Tipping: In marketplaces, where bargaining is the norm, the final price you settle on can include a small tip to the vendor. This is seen as a courteous way to show appreciation for reaching an agreement.

Respect Local Customs: Tipping should be a genuine expression of gratitude. While it's good to tip for good service, avoid excessive tipping, as it can be seen as ostentatious. Be respectful of local customs and practices.

When Not to Tip: In government-operated museums and historic sites, tipping is generally not expected. Use your discretion and observe local behaviour to determine when and how much to tip.

In summary, tipping in Morocco is a way to show appreciation for good service and is becoming more common in tourist areas. While it may not be as prevalent as in some other countries, understanding and respecting local tipping customs can enhance your travel experience and foster positive interactions with the Moroccan people you encounter during your visit.

AMS, or acute mountain sickness, is common at high altitudes. At elevations over 3,000m three quarters of people can expect to suffer mild symptoms. The occurrence of altitude sickness is dependent upon several factors, such as elevation, rate of ascent, and the individual’s susceptibility. Many people experience mild altitude sickness during the normal acclimatisation process. The mild discomfort that accompanies this adaptation should be considered normal and acceptable.

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In the event that the climbers arrive at Marrakech International airport and proceed directly to the mountains to begin their trek, we will require their flight details during the booking process. Upon receiving this information, we will dispatch one of our drivers to meet them at the airport. Our drivers can be identified by carrying a sign bearing the name of the primary contact person for the climbing group.

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You will be collected from your Riad at 0800 am and transferred to Imlil where you will meet your guide. Your guide will do a briefing and check your equipment. There are shops to rent equipment in Imlil centre if required. 

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Not if your flight arrives late. Your guide will check your equipment either on the  journey from Marrakech to Imlil or once you arrive in Imlil. 

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Toubkal, located in the High Atlas Mountains of Morocco, experiences winter conditions from December to February. During these months, the weather can be harsh and challenging, with cold temperatures and the possibility of snowfall, especially at higher elevations. Toubkal is the highest peak in the Atlas Mountains, standing at 4,167 metres (13,671 feet) above sea level.

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In the event that a climber is required to cancel their place on a climb, please see here for details of how costs for arrangements to which we will have committed ourselves on the strength of a confirmed booking having been placed with us, are to be borne.

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This is the Cookie Policy for teamtoubkal.com, accessible from teamtoubkal.com.

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Things that are included in the cost of your Toubkal climb are:

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Welcome to the Team Toubkal Gallery – As passionate explorers of the Atlas Mountains, we invite you to explore this curated collection of images that tell the tales of our thrilling excursions, breathtaking landscapes, and the vibrant culture that awaits those who embark on a trek with us. Each photograph is a glimpse into the heart of Toubkal, where ancient trails meet modern explorers, and where every step unfolds a story of discovery. Whether you're considering joining us on a trek or simply seeking inspiration, our gallery is a testament to the unparalleled experiences that await those who choose to venture with Team Toubkal. Let the images speak, and may they kindle the spirit of adventure within you.

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Technically an ascent of Toubkal is classified as a Very High altitude zone. Altitude is defined on the following scale: High Altitude Classification of Zones

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Climbing Mount Toubkal can be challenging, but it is considered a relatively easy climb compared to other high-altitude peaks. The mountain has an elevation of 4,167 metres (13,671 feet) and is the highest peak in North Africa.

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